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20121031
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, buying majority control of the u.s. cell company. and with nearly one-in-three americans working contract or part-time jobs. we kick off a week-long look at how a nation of freelancers is changing our labor force. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! a u-turn on wall street today. stocks rose, rebounding from sell-offs last week. good news about the american consumer put investors in a buying mood. the dow jumped 95 points, the nasdaq rose 20 and the s&p 500 up 11. retail sales rose more than 1% in september, which was better than expected. it follows an even bigger gain in august and its the best back- to-back showing since 2010. erika miller has a closer look at the data and what consumers were loading up on last month. >> reporter: it seems pretty unbelievable. but a single electronic devices appears to have powered the gain in u.s. retail sales last month. if you haven't guessed it, we're talking about the iphone 5. a remarkable five million of them were sold in their first weekend alone. and that appears to have boosted electronics sales by 4.5% in september. that was the biggest incre
on "n.b.r."! >> tom: two of china's top telecommunications companies are a threat to u.s. national security. that's the conclusion of the u.s. house intelligence committee after a year-long investigation into emerging technology giants z.t.e. and huawei. huawei says the report relies on rumors and speculation, and the company warns a trade battle could cost the jobs of thousands of workers in the united states. but, as darren gersh reports, there is growing bipartisan agreement that this is the right time to get tough on chinese cyber-theft. >> reporter: in unusually blunt language the bipartisan leadership of the house committee warned u.s. companies not to buy their broadband networking equipment from z.t.e. and huawei. >> our advice to the private sector is this: your obligation is to consider larger data protection and national security implications of your business decisions and we would not advise doing business with these two companies. >> reporter: washington has become increasingly alarmed by cyber-security threats believed to have been launched from china. cyber theft of
they going to start moving in the right direction. >> and you were elling me that as far as u.s. investors are concerned, that there has been a decoupling of what is going on between the u.s. and urope. especially as we see hat spain is probably going to get money it needs and its ratings are stabilized by moodies recently it so tell us eye little bit more that there is decoupling going on. >> sure. and i think from the market's perspective we are starting to see a decoupling. the basic they are lee is there were two big issues in europe. there was a fiscal crisis and a european banking crisis. i think the market is starting to realize t rt the fiscal cries his take a long lved.to get re yet thelv banking crisis to ank certain extent has been contained by the ecb stepping in to become the lender of last resort.of so for that reason, we are looking at the markets here in the u.s. starting to focus more on fundamentals here in the united states, so much in evy headline coming out of europe. >> should we be more concerned about what is going on in china, especially with the news that came out
u.s. economy picks up steam thanks to sp. ding by consumers and the government. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. we take you to a wells fargo event in chicago, where housing grants could turn renters into buyers. >> tom: then, from tax hikes to corporate earnings worries,o tonight's "market monitor" guest says investors are facing a cliff of concern. robert stovall of wood asset manament joins us. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."!me >> tom: the u.s. economy actually sped up in the third quarter, surprising economists and maybe you too. thanks to a pick-up in spending by conumers, the federal government and the housing c sector, the gross domestic product grew at a 2% annual rate in july through september. that 2% pace was stronger than expected and much better than what the economy experienced in the second quarter. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at the data and what it suggests about the economy the final months of this year. >> reporter: an economy growing at a 2% annual rate is hardly anything to celebrate. sure it could've been worse. but, clearly at three-years post gr
through those trillions of dollars spent by the u.s. government each year.n >> reporter: what you might not know about the federal deficit. a guided tour in and around washington, d.c. with the "wall street journal's" david wesson. >> woodruff: we have another in our series of topics not being talked about in the campaign. tonight's missinissue is europe's debt crisis. >> brown: an ancient and historic city at risk in a modern-day civil war.is we look at the destruction in aleppo, syria. >> this is one of the great tragedies. aleppo's an extraordinary cross roads of cultures, religions, all built on aro strata of centuries of --t >> woodruff: and ray suarez has the story of a 19th century recording made on tinfoil by thomas edison, digitally converted so we can hear it. >> brown: th's all ahead on tonight's newshour. 's major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology
that's right before we go into the fiscal cliff debate in the u.s. the fed is going to be very concerned about that and put out a very tough stress test on the banks. we'll see what happens, but i think it could be yet again a little bit disappointed for what we hoped for in terms of dividends. > dividends. >> susan: we're going to have to leave it there. any disclosures, fred, on the stocks you talked about? >> no. thanks. great to be on with you, susie. >> susan: thanks, have a great weekend. fred cannon. >. >> i'm diane eastabrook in chicago. still ahead, is the housing market ready to rally? i'll tell you what one expert thinks. >> susie: american consumers are feeling pretty good about the economy. the university of michigan's latest reading on consumer sentiment hit a five-year high. that comes as the treasury reports the u.s. budget deficit topped $1 trillion in fiscal 2012. that's our fourth-largest budget deficit since world war two. that held wall street's gains in check: the dow rose 2.5 points, the nasdaq fell five. the s&p down four. for the week, the major avera
heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close with snapshots of three of this year's macarthur genius award winners, each with a unique view of war. >> people tend to look at the military, they tend to look at war and they tend to look at conflict as something very black and white. it's not like that at all. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: creating new enriching experiences. through intel's philosophy of "invest you for the future" we're helping bring these new capabilities to market. we're investing billions of dollars in r&d around the globe to have the heart of tomorrow's innovations. by investing today in technologicalled advances here at intel, we can help make a better tomorrow. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to l
demand has doubled. there's high growth also here in the u.s. and we've seen that in the aerospace industry, very, very nice. we're seeing it in the u.s. automotive segment, very nice, and then there are on the other side -- i mean, coming down. we've seen the heavy truck segment coming down substantially, pretty much in the u.s., and building and constructions on the commercial building and construction side, there's still very little signs of life there. >> susie: you know wha, are your calculus telling you? we hear how businesses are weighed down by uncertainty. are they puting in more orders with you, or less? >> well, it's slowing down a little bit on some segments and other segments are strong. i believe if you look at it on a regional basis. the euro sown, as we've seen yesterday from projections. it's obviously in a difficult spot and continues to slow down. i just spent a week in china two weeks ago and had a lot of meetings with customers and as well as high government officials, and i could see that they're putting in a similar program which is strongly targeted on the i
prices are rising and homes are most people's biggest asset.r only about half of u.s. households even own stocks. but what about anxiety about the presidential election and fiscal cliff? >> i think consumers really will not take notice of the political risk and political events until we are in some real critical break down stages. >> reporter: so, many consumers are feeling good heading into the holidays, even if the od in corporate america is souring. erika miller, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: still ahead, the crash gold joined the sell-off today, followi stocks lower, as concerns about earnings and europe, raised new questions about demand. s gold fell over $20 to $17.24 an ounce, hitting a six-week low. meanwhile, european leaders wrapped up their latest summit today, the fourth this year wi progress on establishing a single banking supervisor for the euro-zone. its a move that would allow the e.u.'s rescue fund to start recapitalizing ailing banks. >> susie: from wall street to >> susie: from wall street to washington: a stern warning. top banking c.e.o.'s tell lawmakers letting the fi
and the u.s. economy, market prosd redict stocks prices will remain relatively stuck. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. s >> susie: still ahead, tonight's et: regionalst t nks, a e okwht why the housing comeback can't save the regional bank stocks. it's make or break tonight, for the presidential candidates. itpolls show president obama and governor mitt romney are neck- and-neck. s tonight they have their third and final debate in boca rato and tom is there. tom.at florida is the big fridz for the campaign. it has the most number of electoral vote its at stake, in the fall election. it also a state that has felt the full force of the great recession. the housing market in some areas in florida has shown signs of life but remains well bloat boon years. the job market in the sunshine state has seenlow recovery. >> t lunch crowd start to its file in to vinnie's all day calf nie boca raton around 11:30. despite it's name vinnys is owned by a guy named jay dietz. he bought the restaurant from vinny more than a decade ago. >> food prices are going up a couple extra dollars i won't sacrifice
. >> woodruff: that last point involved the assault on the u.s. consulate in benghazi libya and the death of ambassador chris stevens on the night of september 11. the administration initially blamed an anti-muslim film for inciting the trouble. more recently officials have said new information indicates it was a terrorist attack. today romney again criticized the president's response in libya. >> i want to be very clear. the blame for the murder of our people in libya and the attacks on our embassies in so many other countries lie solely with those who carry them out. no one else. but it is our responsibility and the responsibility of the president to use america's greatest power to shape his not to lead from behind. leaving our destiny at the mercy of events. >> woodruff: for its par, the obama campaign aired a new ad that accused romney of injecting politics into a national tragedy with his initial response to the consulate attack. >> when our u.s. diplomats were attacked in libya, the "new york times" said romney's knee-jerk response showed an extraordinary lack of presidential charac
telecom equipment makers in the world-- are a threat to u.s. security. >> ifill: we update the presidential race as both candidates compete in battleground states, and we preview the "choice 2012," airing tonight on frontline. >> woodruff: from our climate change series, hari sreenivasan reports on urban areas heating up, and one city's efforts to cool down. >> ifill: and ray suarez has the story of a mexican drug lord killed in a gunfight, and his corpse stolen from the funeral home. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the former football coach who p
workers since the great recession. the u.s. economy may be recovering, but there has not been much of a gain ine cotruction employment. >> construction employment has been very spotty. we've seen a couple of months and then it flatns out or even drops back down.fl >> reporter:n the past two years, the constructn n industry has added 36,0ry jobs.36 that's fraction of the 3.9t' million positions that have been created in the private sector overall. but there has beeone bright spot across the nation: apartment construction. ige reason has as much to do with lifestyle preference, as economics. >> there does seem to be a shift in preferences among young, potential homebuyers to live closer to the city or in the first ring of suburbs. many of them are looking o ay in apartments living rather than having a home further out where they need a car to get any where. they would have more of a mortgage they would be tied into. >> reporter: on the flip side, public spending on constructiono has fallen sharply. it's down 3.5% from a year ago, as state and local governments tighten their belts. th
all out in september, a hopeful sign that the u.s. economy may be picking up. >> tom: i'm tom hudson. ben bernanke defends his strategy at the federal reserve to do more to help the economy. >> susie: and how technology is making it possible for doctors to go paperless. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: the first day of the new quarter, kicks off with a blue chip rally. investors were encouraged by a report showing that american factories were busy in september. a popular index of national factory activity rose to 51.5 last month, from 49.6 in august. it was the fastest pace of production since may. but that upbeat news was overshadowed by comments from federal reserve chief ben bernanke, saying the economy is not growing fast enough to bring down the unemployment rate. we'll have more on that in a moment. those two events led to volatile trading here on wall street. the dow rose about 78 points, but was up as much as 155 points earlier. the nasdaq drifted in and out of positive and negative territory, finally losing more than 2.5 points, and the s&p rose almost fo
to be building a new foundation. that's according to the latest snapshot of the u.s. economy released today by the federal reserve. the so-called "beige book" compiles data from 12 fed districts, and it shows residential real estate improved in "all" districts in september. anecdotes from business contacts and economists noted existing home sales strengthened, while prices rose or stayed stable. suzanne pratt takes a closer look at whether the broader economy is also showing signs of strength. >> reporter: here's a shocker: the u.s. economy is growing, but only at modest pace. that's what anecdotes, not hard numbers, from the fed's regional banks suggest about the business climate. 10 of the 12 fed districts reported economic activity in september expanded modestly since the last snapshot. only new york and kansas city saw a leveling off or slowing of growth. residential real estate was the one major sweet spot, showing widespread improvement. >> we've seen a pickup in house prices, we've seen a pickup in construction activity, a little bit better demand for loans. so, it generally corrobor
explosion in the gulf of mexico, a layer of oil is floating in the spill area. the u.s. coast guard today said oil samples match b.p.'s macando well, and the oil giant says the sheen likely came from a bent pipe under the surface. lawmakers are calling for an inspection, but federal officials say they don't think the oil will make it to shore. two years ago, the transocean- owned and british petroleum- operated "deepwater horizon" rig exploded, killing 11 people and causing the worst offshore oil spill in u.s. history. weaker than expected demand-- that's what advanced micro devices said tonight as it cut third-quarter revenue estimates. the computer chip maker says a sluggish global economy is hurting sales across all product lines. amd now sees revenues falling 10% to around $1.3 billion. the shares ended the regular trading session up slightly at $3.20 a share. for the year, they're down 41%, and in after-hours trading tonight, they fell below $3. the a.m.d. warning comes as we see personal computer sales in a nosedive. two research firms are out with new data showing p.c. shipments in
time in three sessions, u.s. stocks suffered a sharp sell-off. prices fell as weak finance l results from corporate americal fed fear about the global economy. at the closing bell, the dow shed 243 points, the nasdaq lost 26.5, the s&p dropped almost 21 points, sending markets to levels not seen since early september. the heavy selling came after everal household names reported weak quarterly financial reports and lowered their expectations for the rest of the year. 3-m, dupont, and xerox wereev among those releasing disappointing results. erika miller reports worries about revenues have cast a shadow over the profit picture.h >> reporter: yes, it's earnings season. but earnings are not the most important indicator this quarter. it's revenues-- how much money a company makes before expenses. >> profits can go down, profits can go up. sales, you want to see nice steady growth. and when you are seeing big drops in revenues and revenue misses, that's definitely a red flag. >> reporter: in the latest quarter, a slew of big name firms have reported higher earnings but lower renues,en incl
, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: u.s. supreme court handed democrats and president obama a victory today. the court refused to block ohio voters from casting ballots on the last three days before election day. changes in state law would have stopped early voting during that period for everyone except military personnel and people living abroad. democrats argued that amounts to unequal treatment, and a lower federal court agreed. today, the supreme court refused to intervene. more than 56 million americans are going to be getting just a bit more money from social security. it's part of an annual cost-of- living adjustment. the announcement today said monthly payments will rise by 1.7%, starting in january. that works out to an average bump of roughly $21 a month, or $252 a year. the adjustment is based on the rate of inflation, which has been relatively low in 2012. regulators in europe have asked google to clarify its new privacy policy and make it easier for users to opt out. the policy allows the internet giant to combine data collected across many s
minority, about 9% of the u.s. electorate, in a tight election, these voters could end up providing the winner with the margin of victory. >> brown: judy woodruff gets an inside view of the financial crisis and the government ba out from former fdic head sheila bair. >> warner: and markhields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.hi >> major funding for the c2 newour has been provided by:c2 ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. and carnegie corporation. >> and with the ooing support of these institutions and foundat.nsoi and... friends of the newshou >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. anby contributions to your p station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: lebanon found itself reliving a nightmarish past today after the worst bombing in fr years. at least eit people were killed and nearly 80 wounded in a car-bomb attack.le the explosion rocked central beirut as afternoon rush hour was getting underway, tearing through a m
bounced around today, finally closing down at $92 a barrel on a bigger than expected increase in u.s. supplies. gasoline prices fell and now average $3.75 a gallon. prices at the pump were a hot topic in the presidential debate last night. we talk now about the outlook for energy with gareth lewis-ok davies commodities strategist at b.n.p. paribas. so you heard it last night, the candidates went toe to toe in the debate. governor romney accusing the president that for a doubling of gasoline prices over the last four years president obama defending himself saying it wasn't his fought that there was a recession and a recovery. soho was right here? >> well, really oil prices as a global phenomenon is dependent on what's happening with the world as a whole. so there's a limit to what one country, one government can in terms of oil prices. what we've seen in the united states is oil production in the u.s. is increasing. but due to other factors arou the world and the middle east we're still having higher prices and that's impacting the price of crude. at the moment price of gasoline is be
debates. i personally admire their work. the u.s. is much more diverse than that. >> were you angry? were you hurt? >> we don't want to be invisible. we are not invisible. we are making sure that even with an accent that people hear what we're saying. yes, of course. >> we are mainstreaming. you try to separate us from ethnic media and mainstream media. we are mainstream media. we compete directly with abc, nbc and cbs. in many states we have higher ratings. the difference between us and them, it's under the same category, is the language. we transmit in a different language, however, now we're changing that. >> what do you mean? >> we're changing that now because now we have the joint venture with abc and we are going to be doing the same thing that we're doing but do it in english so we can make sure we have all the market. the special thing about that is it's not only for that sector of latinos who is more english dominant and prefers to speak english, but i think it actually contributes to the society and to democracy in this country so that everyone who speaks english in this country
into security failures at the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we head to colorado, where the presidential candidates are targeting suburban voters. >> some of the things romney supports, i don't think are conducive to women's issues and as a business owner, i don't think obama is a good choice. >> ifill: outrage in pakistan, after an outspoken 14-year-old was shot by the taliban for promoting education for girls. >> woodruff: and we examine new evidence that lance armstrong was at the center of a sophisticated professional doping program, including testimony from his former teammates. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the supreme court heard arguments today in one of the most closely watched cases of the term. it marked a return to the decades-long legal debate over affirmative action
u.s. courts to bring international human rights law into effect against multinational corporations. >> right. brown: trying to spit it out. mulley national corporations is what i'm trying to say. >> it involves a 1789 law, the alien tort statute. very simple, straight-forward law that says federal courts have jurisdiction over actions brought by aliens who have been basically injuredded by violations of international law or violations of treaties of the united states. this is oal business. the court heard arguments last term on whether corporations could be held liable under that statute. then it later ordered reargument on a broader question. that is whether these cases can be brought in u.s. courts against any defendant who committed a violation in a foreign country. and today the court heard arguments on that. it's hard to tell. it seemed a number of justices were not happy with business' approach which is to say there is no extra territorial application of this law, period. and yet also we're not too crazy about the human rights groups' argument that federal courts should be op
said they hope the agreement will isolate the extremists. the u.s. food and drug administration has widened a warning about medicines made by a specialty pharmacy near boston. the new england compounding center sold tainted steroids linked to an outbreak of fungal meningitis. as of today, there were 212 cases nationwide, and at least 15 deaths. now the f.d.a. says it's investigating other illnesses that may be tied to the company's products. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: and we return to politics. the battle lines are drawn in this year's massachusetts senate race, where a republican incumbent is looking to survive in a blue state. gwen ifill has our report. >> yeah, yeah, ifill: for nine years ray flynn a staunch life-long democrat was the mayor of boston. this year he's working to re-elect a republican, scott brown. >> i see him with the veterans. he sits there and has a beer with the veterans and talks over all the issues. they love him for it. >> your u.s. senator scott brown ifill: in 2010 brown won the senate seat once held by ted kenn
brown examines the reality and the rhetoric over u.s.-china policy and trade. >> woodruff: from our brand-new series, "agents for change," fred de sam lazaro profiles a group that offers refuge for victims of modern-day slavery in the philippines. >> 15% of the gross domestics products comes from money sent home by overseas filipinos, but there is a dark downside that makes these vulnerable. >> and spencer michael has the story of >> ifill: and spencer michels has the story of high tech sailboats gearing up for the america's cup in san francisco next year. c2 woodruff: that's all ahe on tot's newour.r. major fundinfor the c2 newour has en provi: b >> when i was i c2cident, i i was worried, t health em s ac2 lane all it ow withc2 united health care, i gottc2 th care forr life,,c2 c2formion on m phone, conctio to doctorc2 who t wherere i'm friiÍo, d tools toto estite whc2 are costs, i might ver mis a be >> we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. united health care. >> beijing, for 15 years, viking has brought 40 milli
, we look at the stepped-up cyber attacks on u.s. banks by iranian hackers. >> warner: we have a battleground dispatch from new hampshire, where the focus is on women voters and women candidates. >> it does seem striking, having all women, potentially, be the representatives to washington, and also potentially sitting as the executive of the state. >> woodruff: on the daily download, ray suarez talks with lauren ashrn and howard kurtz a about debate watchers using twitter and other social media. >> warner: and gwen ifill sits down with author ted widmer. he's been listening to once-secret tape recordings by president john f. kennedy. >> it's really a remarkable chance for the american people to hear what it is like to be president in a very visceral way. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> computing surrounds us. sometimes it's obvious and sometimes it's very surprising in where you find it. soon, computing intelligence in unexpected places will change our lives in truly profound ways. technology can
for the markets. here in the u.s., the dow lost almost 33, the nasdaq gained 6.5, and not much change for the s&p; it's up about a point. >> reporter: i'm darren gersh. still ahead, both mitt romney and barack obama want to put more americans back to work. but is job training the right answer? we'll take a look. >> tom: six months before the credit crunch hit full force, j.p. morgan bought failing investment bank bear stearns. that was in 2007. now, j.p. morgan faces a lawsuit, claiming it inherited massive fraud on the part of the company it purchased. the civil lawsuit alleges systemic fraud with the packaging and sale of mortgage- backed securities by bear stearns before it was taken over by j.p. morgan. the bank says it intends to fight the case. eric schneiderman is the attorney general of new york. >> eric, you represent the people of new york state. what did your citizens lose in the deals thaw are accused of being fraudulent? >> new yorkers, like people all over the united states bought shares in mortgage backed securities, pension funds invested in them. people bought homes baseed on w
as it seems? erika miller takes a closer look at the data and what it says about the u.s. economy. >> reporter: 3-tenths of a percent does not seem like much. but, when it comes to the nation's unemployment rate, a 3- tenths of a percent drop is actually staggering. the unemployment rate now stands at 7.8 percent. that's the lowest level since january 2009, when president obama took office. even more remarkable is the reason for the drop. >> the unemployment rate decline was not because people dropped out of the labor force. to the contrary. the labor force actually but the household survey estimate of employment increased even more. >> reporter: the household survey shows total employment rose by 873,000. that's the biggest gain since ronald reagan was president. but there's a catch. two-thirds of those jobs are part-time positions, taken because no full-time work was available. and there's another troubling sign: >> what we have is hiring that is concentrated, most recently, in the government sector. hiring that is concentrated, most recently in education and healthcare. a little bit of posi
tonight, hurricane sandy is ready to make landfall in the u.s., already it's an historic storm, with historic preparations. stock markets closed. and coast lines evacuated with tens of millions of people sitting in the forecast path of the massive storm. sandy is a huge storm expected to come ashore in southern new jersey. but the hurricane force winds have been battering the eastern seaboard for hours. those winds extend out 175 miles from the center of the storm. those winds are pushing the atlantic ocean up and over many coast-lin.. from rhode island, south to the jersey shore. coastal flooding is a significant risk thanks to the storm surge, potentially reaching 11 feet in new york harbor. battery park on the tip of manhattan is under a mandatory evacuation, as waves already have topped the sea wall. low lying areas are at substantial risk of flood water including the wall street area, especially if the worst of the surge hits during high tide tonight, at 9pm eastern time. that threat of flooding was one reason u.s. stock markets were closed today, the first un- i scheduled
largest oil producing nation. and a critical supplier of crude oil to the u.s. its number one customer. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: carnegie corp >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: more jobs, less unemployment. the september numbers offered the latest look into the u.s. economy, and the latest fuel for the fight over economic policy in the presidential campaign. it was the kind of news that president obama hoped for, just over a month before the election and two days after a sub-par debate outing. >> more americans entered the work force, more people are getting jobs. >> brown: indeed, september's unemployment rate, calculated by a survey of households, fell to 7.8%. that's the lowest since the president took office. a second survey, of businesses, showed that employers added a net of 114,000 jobs, a
union will share this year's nobel peace prize. ray suarez interviews the e.u. ambassador to the u.s. >> brown: we come back to politics as paul solman asks this question: >> who do you trust >> woodruff: plus mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the-vice presidential debate left democrats today saying they're back on track after a strong showing. republicans argued their man held his own. instant polls split on who won last night's confrontation, but both camps claimed victory. vice president biden moved on today to wisconsin, paul ryan's home state. >> anyone that watched that debate, i don'
toward the east coast of the u.s. today afteleaving at least 40 people dead across the caribbean. it battered the bahamas as a category-one storm today, knocking down trees and power lines as it went. and sandy is already stirring u strong windand pounding surf along the florida coastline.wi where exactly the storm lands in the u.s. next week is still a question, but preparations for heavy rains and high winds were underway from the mid-atlantic to new england. forecasters say the hurricane could spawn a "super storm", after colliding with a cold front from the north and a winter storm in the west. for more, we turn tjeannetteje calle of accuweather.com. >> so janth heading into this weekend, what do people on the eastern see board have to be concerned about? >> sandy will continue to head northward tonight into tomorrow. an area that should be on the lookout over the next 24 hours include northeast florida to coastal georgia, including eastern sections of the carolinas.er we're talking squally weather beginning later tonight into tomorrow fm jacksonville to the outer banks of no
fiscal year. analysts think that's a reachable target because international sales should be strong and u.s. farmers will be rebounding from last summer's drought. >> in terms of impact of the drought grains stocks are low so corn and soybeans and the other seeds that they sell are going to need to be planted in great quantities so that should also deliver growth. >> reporter: werneth thinks even if the economies here and abroad worsen next year, monsanto should still reap solid profits because in good times and bad, people and animals still have to eat. diane eastabrook, "n.b.r.," chicago. >> susie: a new innovation coming soon to target. shoppers won't need to wait in the check out line to make a purchase: they will be able to scan and buy exclusive toys on shelves at the front of the store. the plan lets customers scan codes with their smartphones, and get the items shipped for free. the new strategy starts in about two weeks, just in time for the crucial holiday shopping season. target is counting on this strategy to boost holiday sales. >> tom: stocks edged higher after the encouraging
mercantile exchange credit fed chairman ben bernanke and his renewed push to keep u.s. interest rates ultra low for the run-up in gold. >> the fact that they're going to flood with more, more money is a very good sign for gold, and that's kind of what's propelled us to here. >> reporter: as for where prices are headed next? if the u.s. economic environment remains relatively slow, traders predict new highs for the precious metal could come in the first half of next year. that's if gold is able to break through certain technical levels. >> i think if we can get above $1,816. we should see 19 and a quarter. if we can get above $1,925, then $2,000 is definitely in our sights. >> reporter: experts say one thing that could push gold prices above $2,000 an ounce this year is if president obama is re-elected. the thinking-- the president will keep bernanke employed, which means interest rates stay very, very low. suzanne pratt, nbr, new york. >> tom: stocks moved higher ahead of tomorrow's report on the september job market. the s&p 500 really gained momentum just after 10:00 a.m. eastern time aft
at chase, their returns would legend with a wells or u.s. bank corps. >> sheila bair along with us, author of "bull by the horns." >> susie: as technology changes, so, too, does the workplace. still ahead, how freelancers and online assignments are changing the job market. >> tom: well, outside of that big citibank news, wall street got a series of strong earnings from bellwether companies like johnson and johnson, and positive news from homebuilders. the u.s. homebuilder's confidence index rose to its highest level since 2006, and that helped send wall street on its biggest rally in a month. the dow is up 126, the nasdaq gained 37, and the s&p is up 15. >> susie: shares of both intel and i.b.m. were lower in after- hours trading after their latest quarterly results. both companies are bellwethers in the technology industry, and what they said late today could help set the stage others. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: while analysts saw storm clouds in i.b.m. and intel's results, both companies see their future in a different kind of cloud. intel makes the chips that power the cloud-co
, bringing wind,ain, and snow to parts of the mid-atlantic and northeastern u.s. a she has cut a path of destruction, flooding, and massive power outages as the de th toll from the storm stands at 17 across seven states. even as sandy makes her way to canada, the destruction is devastating. high winds pushed the atlantic ocean up and over seawalls, flooding entire neighborhoods. the wind and water teamed up to cut power to millions of people along the eastern seaboard. the storm surge even continued today as sandy tracked through western pennsylvania and new york state. the storm has affected an estimated one out of every five americans, bringing some business to a standstill over flooding, closed airports, and no public transportation. while rescue efforts continue tonight, early damage estimates are still rough, running between $10 billion a $20 billion,on according to eqecat. hurricane irene did $10 billion damage 14 months ago. >> susie: wall street was closed again today for the second straight day because of hurricane sandy. this is the first two-day weather-related shutdown sin
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: u.s. policy around the e rld takes center stape tonight inal face-off and between president obama and mitt romney.in good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, we get some pre-debate analysis from mark ields and david brooks. >> ifill: tonight's match-up takes place in florida. we travel there to assess the state of the race.an it's getting harder and harder to breakthrough to undecided base voters because there's just such a saturation level of everything and it's so negative. >> woodruff: plus, jeffrey brown looks at where the candidates stand on key foreign policy issues. >> ifill: then, lance armstrong is stripped of his titles and banned from competing for life. ray suarez examines the impact of an athlete's fall from graceo >> woodruff: and we remember a statesman and a proud liberal, presidential candidate and senator george mcgovern. >> your colleague in the press, some of them referring to me as theonscience of the party. tthers talking about me as the peacemaker
in the u.s. has now claimed 14 lives. the centers for disease control reported the latest count today. it said a total of 170 people have been infected across eleven states. the outbreak has been linked to steroid injections for back pain that came from a specialty pharmacy in massachusetts. roughly 14,000 people received the shots. in pakistan, a 14-year-old activist was still fighting for her life today, in critical condition, after being shot by a taliban gunman. malala yousufzai was moved by helicopter to a military hospital in rawalpindi. the teenager had advocated education for girls, and was attacked as she left her school on tuesday. elsewhere in pakistan, officials said a u.s. drone strike killed ten militants near a village in the northwest tribal region. at least 15 others were wounded. a masked gunman in yemen has assassinated a yemeni security official working at the u.s. embassy there. the drive-by shooting happened near the man's home in the capital city sanaa as he headed to work. officials said the attack bore the hallmarks of al qaeda. the victim worked for the embas
- richard haas, president of then council on foreign relatns. he's in chicago.n and in boston, former u.s. diplomat nicholas burns, now with the kennedy school of government at harvard university. welcome to you both. let me just ask you tstart broadly speaking. what do we take away from last night's debate in terms of how well these two candidates understand american foreign policy and would be a good steward of it? let me start with you. nick burns >> well, judy, this may sound startling to say in our present red-blue divided partisan environment but i think we have two impressive people running for president. there botht knowledgeable. they're both very smart about the issues. both of them have been successful in nearly everything they've tried in tir professional lives. president obama was clearly the more knowledgeableir and nuanced and even some's tketed in the way he describedded the challenges to us on the foreign policy and national security landscape. i thought that governor romney had a very strong moment in the debate, a very good moment when he tied together our domestic econ
to the bottom of a deadly attack in libya last month. u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans were killed after gunmen assaulted the u.s. consulate in benghazi. now, two leading house republicans have charged the obama administration rejected requests for enhanced security at the site. clinton cautioned today against a rush to judgment. >> at the beginning of any kind of inquiry or investigation there are going to be different perspectives, different points of view, people trying to present what they believe applies to a certain set of circumstances. but i've also seen how important it is to get everything lined up and analyzed. >> holman: clinton also promised the investigative process will be transparent. more than two million factory workers walked off the job in indonesia today, in a one-day strike demanding better benefits. hundreds of thousands marched through the streets of a jakarta suburb. they called for an increase in the minimum wage plus health insurance and social security for all employees. workers also urged the government to revise a policy that lets
these gigantic monoliths that have he implicit backing of the u.s. government. then thers the other problem of corruption. i hear all the time from hedge funds, ys know, these smaller guys who believe that some of the big investment banks are selling them out to even bigger hedge funds that are giving away information about their positions to even bigger clients so that somebody else can trade against them. or maybe the banks themselves are front running their positions. and trading against their own clients. there's this schism developing between the smaller guy, the medium sized financial player, very, very big too big to fail companies that are perceived asfa getting a break, getting -- and getting the backing of the government, and also are perceived as getting away with stuff that they wouldn't get away with. >> i agree with matt and i think what you're really seeing, ac ually, in terms of the battle of the millionaires versus the billionaires. because it's winner take al dynamic. is not just between, you know, ehe e 10% and the 90%. or the 1% and the 99%. what's quite interesting, an
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